Tuesday, November 27, 2012

November update from Romania

Greetings from Cluj this most blessed and beautiful of days. It has been a few weeks since I last wrote, and so today I wanted to get you caught up on our activities here in Romania. It has seriously been a busy time since I last wrote you. After finishing the addictions conferences with Fr. George and Fr. Iulian, I went back to Cluj for for a few days to get caught up at the day-center. While there a priest, Fr. Ioan Simion, asked me if I would help him to start a counseling program a prison in Cluj. Of course I agreed, and will be meeting with the administration of the prison either in December of January to make the detailed plans. We have an approval from the national prison system to enter and teach about addictions in essentially all of the prisons in Romania, so this should not be a problem. It is just in getting the time to do it. The past 3 weeks I have been living in a small village called "Miclauseni". Metropolitan Teofan, of Iasi, asked me to help do a 28 day treatment program for some "special guests". We will be finishing up next week, and then I will be back in Cluj for a few weeks. Perhaps I should say, "hopefully for a few months". It was such a treat going to Divine Liturgy this morning at the monastery located next to the center we are staying at. We are using the small chapel, as the big church is too expensive to heat in the winter (and it is cold over here right now) so they change over to the chapel. The villagers simply filled the place up. It was very nice, and I am always amazed at the reverence of the village people here in Romania. They are really very poor, and maybe that makes their reverence more obvious. Rather than using poverty as an excuse for self pity or to blame God for their condition, they find comfort in their religion and relationship with God. They are inspiring to me. One last note, Irina, the young lady that was injured in the accident I told you about in my last email, left the hospital last week. She will enter into long term rehabilitation therapy next week as she is still not walking. She has had three surgeries to date. Please do pray for her full recovery, and for her spiritual well being as she lives through this most difficult of times in her young life. If you have any prayers lists, living or fallen asleep, please do feel free to send them over. We are having daily Divine Liturgy at the monastery and we have a prayer list going for the sick, deceased, and the living. I will close for now by wishing you a most blessed and Christ filled day. May our good and loving Lord give you every good thing from His heavenly treasures, joy, peace and a sense of his divine love for us all. It is there for us all the time, all we need to do is to reach out and take it. And I do thank you for your interest in our work, please do keep us in your prayers, we all need them. In His Love, One Day at a Time, Floyd & Ancuta Frantz, OCMC Missionaries to Romania As as a final note, please remember that as OCMC missionaries we are 100 % reliant upon your financial support to continue our work through OCMC. Please consider a small gift so that we can continue to do our Lord's work. If you can make such a donation, send it to: OCMC 220 Mason Manatee Way St. Augustine, Fl. 32086 and please mark the donation "STDIMITRIE/ROMANIA so that we can use the funds directly for the St. Dimitrie Program.

Friday, November 23, 2012

The Hargraves are expecting!

With Deacon James Nicholas, Felice Stewart, and Maria Roeber in Bukoba

Dear friends,
 
Basi, ninyi si wageni tena, wala si watu wa nje; ninyi ni raia pamoja na watu wa Mungu, na ni watu wa jamaa ya Mungu.
 
So then you are no longer strangers and sojourners, but you are fellow citizens with the saints and members of the household of God.
- Ephesians 2:19
 
Greetings from Mwanza, Tanzania. This is James writing.
 
We're expecting!
 
Among the many prayers at our wedding, Father Michael and Father David petitioned God for Daphne and me to "rejoice in the beholding of sons and daughters." It is clear that this prayer was heard.
 
God willing, we look forward to rejoicing in the beholding of our firstborn child this March. We are due around the 21st of the month. We have hoped and prayed for children, and it's exciting to be given such a good gift so very soon. Our child is in good health and is growing rapidly.
 
We're homeless!
 
At the beginning of this month, we were received joyfully into the home where I had lived since January of 2011. My local Tanzanian family was thrilled to meet Daphne, and have been taking very good care of us.
 
But the house- like most homes in Mwanza city- is perched high above the nearest proper road. The only way to reach it is by climbing a steep slope of uneven granite boulders which can get pretty slick when there's mud or sand on them. Pregnancy is giving Daphne sciatica in her hips, and her joints are getting more and more loose and unbalanced.
 
Daphne really wanted to make it work. She'd hoped that she'd get used to the physical strain of the climb to the house. But it's getting worse, not easier, as the pregnancy progresses. By the end of last week, it was obvious that we had to move out immediately.
 
(Daphne's asked me to clarify that her sciatica is not nearly as bad as what affects some women. I'll take her word for it. As long as she's on level ground, she's fine. But when she's scaling mountains, it gets pretty awful.)
 
God is good!
 
We are temporarily staying in the guest room of a lovely house with a friend who has welcomed us warmly. This all came together at the very last minute—we left our old house for good on Friday morning and were invited to stay here about 5pm the same day. God has taken good care of me for years, and by your prayers, we are confident that he will continue to provide for us.
 
But we kind of wish he'd let us know what's ahead more than two hours in advance...
 
Finding housing in Mwanza city is no small task. You may recall that I spent three months living in a guest house in 2010, while I hunted for a place to live. We expect it to be just as tough this time round. Please pray for us.
 
Monday was our first visit with our OB/ GYN in Mwanza. He comes highly recommended, and we like him. We have been advised that this city has good medical facilities for women to give birth if it's not their first pregnancy and there are no known complications. But a first pregnancy carries enough unknowns that if complications do turn up, we might not be able to get what we need here.
 
This means that, God willing, our child will likely be born either in Uganda, Kenya, or the city of Dar es Salaam here in Tanzania. We have investigated some of these options and will continue evaluating. We are confident that we can have a safe and healthy delivery for mother and child in any of these locations. Each has its own advantages and drawbacks.
 
Since our arrival, we have spent time in Bukoba town with fellow OCMC Missionaries Felice Stewart and Maria Roeber. Deacon James Nicholas, our Missionary Director at OCMC, paid us a visit last week. We enjoyed being with everyone in Bukoba, as well as welcoming Deacon James here in Mwanza.
 
Things are as busy as ever at the Church offices. We're preparing to receive a short-term team from Finland and OCMC in a few weeks. Many other things are also in the works. I have spent virtually no time "back at work" yet, as the priorities of finding a home and a place for our child to be born have taken obvious precedence.
 
God is taking good care of us. Daphne and I are thrilled to be here in the Orthodox Church of Mwanza and Western Tanzania, and have been received warmly by His Eminence, Metropolitan Jeronymos as well as Church leadership, fellow missionaries, and the local community. I'm delighted to be chanting regular services--morning and evening, every day- in the Kiswahili language at the Archbishop's chapel. We are present on the mission field where we've been called, and we have each other.
 
I'm doing my best to care for my bride, and feel woefully inadequate. But Daphne is doing well anyway. She is tough, courageous, and positive. I am in awe. If I were in her shoes I'd be a useless mess.
 
Nevertheless, we are under a tremendous amount of stress right now. We have each other, we have the Church, we have a good local network of support, and we have the fervent intercessions of the saints. We have Christ our God, who was born while His mother was traveling, with no home or even room in which to give birth.
 
I've thought about the Nativity of Christ many times. This is the first time I've considered how physically and emotionally overwhelming it might have been for the Mother of God to be uprooted from home in the final weeks of her pregnancy, and how scary it must have been to give birth in a manger. 
 
This is the first time I've considered the terrifying weight of responsibility on the shoulders of St. Joseph the Betrothed. How helpless he might have felt, charged with the care of a pregnant woman but without a home or even a room for the baby to be born. 
 
We sure are in good company. God is with us. Although we feel like strangers and sojourners at this moment, we know that we truly are at home in his household.
 
This letter is already very long, and I haven't told you the half of what's been going on. The past six weeks have been packed. I'd like to tell you more. So much has been fun, encouraging, exciting, and memorable. But I've said enough for now.
 
We know you are praying for us. Keep up the good work.
 
By your prayers in Christ,
 
James and Daphne Hargrave



James Hargrave
Orthodox Church in Tanzania
Holy Archdiocese of Mwanza
PO Box 1113
Mwanza, Tanzania

+255 682 51 36 91 (Tanzania)

htttp://jhargrave.ocmc.org

Sunday, November 4, 2012

Update from Floyd and Ancuta Frantz in Romania

Greetings from Cluj this most blessed and beautiful of days. 
 
It has been a few weeks since I last wrote, and so today I wanted to get you caught up on our activities here in Romania. Is was a busy summer that has passed by us so quickly that only now in late October does it seem like Fall.
 
Our St. Dimitire day-center in Cluj continues to offer a hot meal to the homeless each day, and it has been used to capacity. Also, our counseling groups are staying full. These days we are having a wider spectrum of society come in for help with addictions problems, usually for alcoholism. The drug epidemic has not fully reached Romania. As the economic situation changes, we expect there to be more addiction cases. Of course we also provide spiritual counseling at our day-center, along with job counseling, a place for our homeless clients to shower and wash clothing, and we offer other services to help them improve their lives. We also offer counseling for the family members, even if their partners are not coming to the groups.
 
Regarding the educational side of our program, our faculty course on addictions has been printed by the Patriarchate. That is a big hurdle for us as we did not have the funds to print it ourselves. This month Fr. George A. from Los Angeles and I have been traveling around with the Metropolitan of Iasi giving lectures for the priests in Moldova about the "Passion of Addictions and its Spiritual Healing". We also offered them copies of the faculty course, along with copies of "Steps of Transformation". In all, we did about 10 conferences in 10 days.b
 
OUR TRAINING AT BOTOSANI
 
 
WE WERE ASKED TO DO A PARISH PRESENTATION
 
 
WE WERE WORKING WITH METROPOLITAN TEOFAN OF IASI. MUCH OF OUR WORK IS IN MOLDOVA.
 
 
OUR CONFERENCE OF LAST WEEK AT SIMBATA 
 
The picture above represents an important milestone in my work here in Romania. It was an international conference, hosted by the National Anti-drug Program (PNA) of the Romanian Orthodox Church, the St. Dimitrie Program, Fr. Iulian's program in Iasi, and the Orthodox Faculty Seminary of the University of Sibiu. It was here last week that we began an association of the programs and priests that we have been working with and training for the past several years. It is not formalized yet, but is will be in the next few months. Everything over here takes time. As Bishop Basil in Wichita told me before I came here in 2000, "Floyd, if you go to Romania, you will need to learn patience"...how right he was.
 
I don't like to end on a sad note, but I must this time. One of my staff, Irina, was seriously injured in an automobile accident on her way to the conference at Simbata. The van she was riding in hit a bad place in the road, and the driver lost control. The van went down an embankment and flipped three times. She is still in the hospital, and I ask you to pray for her comfort and return to full health. God will reward you.
 
 
I will close for now by wishing you a most blessed and Christ filled day. May our good and loving Lord give you every good thing from His heavenly treasures, joy, peace and a sense of his divine love for us all. It is there for us all the time, all we need to do is to reach out and take it. 
  
And I do thank you for your interest in our work, please do keep us in your prayers, we all need them.
 
In His Love,  
One Day at a Time,  
Floyd & Ancuta Frantz, OCMC Missionaries to Romania
 
As as a final note, please remember that as OCMC missionaries we are 100 % reliant upon your financial support to continue our work through OCMC. Please consider a small gift so that we can continue to do our Lord's work.
 
If you can make such a donation, send it to:
 
OCMC
220 Mason Manatee Way
St. Augustine, Fl. 32086
 
and please mark the donation "STDIMITRIE/ROMANIA so that we can use the funds directly for the St. Dimitrie Program.
 

 
And please feel free to pass along our email to others who you believe might be interested in our work here in Romania.
 
 
If you would like to contact us through email, please use: Stdimitrie@yahoo.com for myself and the St. Dimitrie Program, orAncutafrantz@yahoo.com for Anca and the Protection Center.
 

 
We do thank you for your interest in our work, for your support, and most of all for your prayers.
 
In His Love,
One day at a time,
Floyd & Ancuta Frantz, OCMC Missionaries